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North American energy ministers sign MOU on climate change and energy collaboration


February 12, 2016   by Canadian Underwriter


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Energy leaders from Canada, Mexico and the United States have signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on climate change and energy collaboration following the North American Energy Ministers Meeting on Friday.

Among other items, the North American Cooperation on Energy Information will see Canada, Mexico and the U.S. share best practices and methods to reduce emissions from the oil and gas sector, including methane and black carbon

The North American Cooperation on Energy Information (NACEI) MOU will see the three countries collaborate and share information on six key areas:

• Identifying trilateral activities to further climate change adaptation and resilience;

• Sharing best practices and seeking methods to reduce emissions from the oil and gas sector, including methane and black carbon;

• Sharing experience and knowledge in the development of reliable, resilient and low-carbon electricity grids;

• Modelling, deploying and accelerating innovation of clean energy technologies, including renewables;

• Exchanging information in order to improve energy efficiency for equipment, appliances, industries and buildings, including energy management systems; and

• Exchanging information and promoting joint action to advance the deployment of carbon capture, use and storage.

Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources, Jim Carr, met with Pedro Joaquín Coldwell, Mexico’s Secretary of Energy and Dr. Ernest Moniz, the United States Secretary of Energy, on Friday in Winnipeg. “The Ministers launched a web platform featuring new energy maps, which for the first time, depict North American energy resources, production and infrastructure in a single place,” Natural Resources Canada said in a statement, noting that the information will be helpful to energy users and stakeholders.

The NACEI follows the initiation of a framework for trilateral consultation and sharing of North American energy information in December 2014. The collaboration effort was launched to improve respective energy import and export data; share publicly available geospatial information related to energy infrastructure; exchange views and projections on cross-border energy flows; and develop a cross-reference for terminology, concepts and definitions.

Between Canada, Mexico and the U.S., $167 billion worth of energy products were traded across the continent last year, Natural Resources Canada said in the statement. The Government of Canada has also committed to investing an additional $300 million a year in clean technology.