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Nova Scotia bulletin provides service, fee schedule to take effect in April


March 27, 2013   by Canadian Underwriter


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A new slate of maximum fees and disbursements payable for services, activities or functions under Nova Scotia’s Automobile Insurance Diagnostic and Treatment Protocols Regulations will take effect on April 1.

Money

A bulletin issued last week by the Nova Scotia’s Finance Department details the service and fee schedule:

  • completion of a patient assessment by a physician, physiotherapist or chiropractor – $100;
  • provision of the first three treatment visits for treatment authorized for a whiplash I injury, a first-degree or a second-degree sprain or strain by a physiotherapist or chiropractor – $75 per visit;
  • provision of as many as seven additional treatment visits for treatment authorized for a first-degree or a second-degree sprain or strain by a physiotherapist or chiropractor – $45 per visit;
  • provision of first seven treatment visits for treatment authorized for a whiplash II injury, a third-degree sprain or strain by a physiotherapist or chiropractor – $75 per visit;
  • provision of as many as 14 additional treatment visits for treatment authorized for a whiplash II injury, a third-degree sprain or strain by a physiotherapist or chiropractor – a $45 per visit;
  • completion of an Injury Management Consultant Report by a physiotherapist or chiropractor (covers fees for up to one hour of the consultant’s time) – $226; and
  • completion of an Injury Management Consultant Report by a physician (includes fees for up to one-half hour of the consultant’s time) – $150.

The revised diagnostic and treatment protocols for minor injuries are among the changes flowing from Nova Scotia’s Auto Insurance Reforms 2011. A fact sheet on the reforms notes the limit on pain and suffering awards for minor injuries was increased, and the definition of “minor injury” was narrowed to include only sprains, strains and certain types of whiplash-associated disorders.

An independent automobile insurance review commissioned by the provincial government recommended adopting diagnostic and treatment protocols for minor injuries, based on Alberta’s model, in place since 2004, and regarded as working well.

“The introduction of diagnostic treatment protocols for minor injuries will mean Nova Scotians who are injured in an automobile collision have direct access to physiotherapy and chiropractic treatment without waiting for approval from an insurer or a physician’s referral,” the fact sheet states.

“This reform is patient-focused and delivers better care sooner in order to promote healthier outcomes for automobile accident victims. Diagnostic and treatment protocols will promote consistency and quality of care for minor injuries,” it adds.