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How much damage a toilet malfunction can cause

February 11, 2020 by Greg Meckbach

Your property client’s flood risk could arise from a weak link in the bathroom. Water damage claims of over $100,000 can result if the supply line feeding water to the toilet breaks, says metallurgist Paul Okrutney, founder of Toronto-based insurtech

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Overseas working conditions: Is your client on the hook?

February 8, 2020 by Greg Meckbach, Associate Editor

Corporate clients who get their goods from jurisdictions with inadequate protection for workers’ rights could end up being named as defendants

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What underwriters can learn from Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs

February 6, 2020 by Greg Meckbach

Hail is a major driver of insured property damage in Canada, but testing resilience of roofing material by dropping steel balls on it has limited value, a CatIQ Connect speaker suggested Wednesday. Roy Wright, president and CEO of the Insurance

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What’s new in 2020 with Intact Centre home flood risk assessment training

January 23, 2020 by Greg Meckbach

Want to share basement flood horror stories with other brokers or home inspectors, and hear how industry peers tackled their problems? The Home Flood Risk Assessment Training Course, launched in 2018, now has discussion sessions, said Daniel Filippi, program manager

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Couple sued over basement flooding after selling fixer-upper

January 20, 2020 by Greg Meckbach

A Kelowna couple have been sued for $168,000 after a house they sold suffered basement flooding. In Brunning v. Cummings, released Jan. 13, Supreme Court of British Columbia Justice Gordon Weatherill awarded the damages to Cheri and Joel Brunning. The

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How this buried oil tank came back to haunt former homeowners

January 17, 2020 by Greg Meckbach

If your clients are selling their home, should you ask whether prospective buyers want written assurance that any oil tanks are removed and the soil cleaned up? Scott Warren and Antonia Camille Fantillo sold their home in early 2016. They

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Commercial clients should do this before they leave for the day

January 16, 2020 by Greg Meckbach

Are your clients checking the bathrooms before they leave work for the day? “The last thing you want is to leave someone with access to your property after the doors have been locked,” Northbridge Insurance noted in Closing time: Making

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Why this town is not liable for electric shock hazard at sports field

January 8, 2020 by Greg Meckbach

An Ontario municipality was recently found not liable for an electrical hazard created when a light pole at a sports field was struck by lightning, allowing the light to continue functioning while letting current leak into the ground near the

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Why Supreme Court of Canada ruled in favour of Lloyd’s

December 2, 2019 by Greg Meckbach

A $5.6-million court award in favour of Lloyds Underwriters and one of its Quebec-based shipowner clients has been restored by the Supreme Court of Canada. Desgagnés Transport Inc. v. Wärtsilä Canada Inc., released Nov. 28, means a section of the

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Who’s liable for what in this $2.2-million fuel oil spill

November 18, 2019 by Greg Meckbach

Another chapter in the sad story of a $2.2-million residential heating fuel oil spill, into a fresh-water lake, has been closed. The Supreme Court of Canada announced this past Thursday it will not hear an appeal from Thompson Fuels of

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How change of backyard elevation spawns liability risk

November 12, 2019 by Greg Meckbach

A London, Ont. homeowner is in legal trouble because the water that was supposed to flow east from his neighbour’s backyard, across his property, started going the wrong way 12 years ago. In Dankiewicz v. Sullivan, released Nov. 4, Justice

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Evacuation order lifted nearly two months after crane collapse

November 6, 2019 by The Canadian Press

HALIFAX – The last three businesses evacuated when a crane collapsed in downtown Halifax are being allowed to return to their locations, almost two months after a storm toppled it. The final stage of the crane and debris removal from